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  • rhyta

     (1600 BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    MinoanH: 2 13/16 in. (7.1 cm)Acquired by Henry Walters, 1929
    This rhyton is carved in the round with details incised. It is interior drilled with a large hole in the top of the head, ending in a small hole through the mouth. The eyes are to be inlaid. There is a double axe on the forehead. One horn is broken and has been repaired.
  • jugs

     (7th century BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Cypriote8 1/4 in. (21 cm)Museum purchase with funds provided by the S. & A. P. Fund, 1973
    Small and portable, these jugs have been found throughout the lands surrounding Cyprus. Called Black-on-Red Ware, this attractive ceramic type comprises mostly small jugs. The red-brown slip has a polished, lustrous surface with simple geometric designs painted in black. The decoration of this pottery follows the "circle" style of the Bichrome Ware jugs.
  • goblets

     (ca. 1200 BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Mycenaean6 15/16 x 6 3/8 in. (17.7 x 16.2 cm) (h. x diam.); at handles: 8 7/16 in. (21.5 cm) (w.)Acquired by Henry Walters, 1924
    The shape of this goblet and its painted decoration, featuring an upright cuttlefish spreading its tentacles to either side in a stiffly symmetrical fashion, are typically Mycenaean.
  • sealstone; seals

     (ca. 1500)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    MinoanH: 1/2 x W: 1 1/16 x D: 7/16 in. (1.3 x 2.8 x 1.1 cm)Museum purchase, 1941
    Carved sealstones were popular ornaments among Bronze Age Minoans and Mycenaeans and served as insignia of rank and social status. They were influenced by the elaborate traditions of stamp and cylinder seals developed in the Near East and Egypt. The frequent appearance of bulls on seals may be inspired by the many Minoan palace wall-paintings and reliefs featuring the animal.
  • figurines

     (16th century BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Minoan8 7/16 in. (21.5 cm)Acquired by Henry Walters
    Despite the delicate nature of the precious gold and ivory materials, the stance of this small figurine conveys power and strength. It closely resembles ceramic statuettes identified as goddesses or priestesses found in the sanctuary space known as the "Pillar Shrine" within the Minoan palace of Cnossus, Crete. The snakes adorning the figure are symbolic of fertility and regenerative powers.
  • sealstone; seals

     (1600-1500 BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Minoan5/8 x 15/16 x 3/8 in. (1.6 x 2.5 x 1 cm)Acquired by Henry Walters, 1913
    Carved sealstones were popular ornaments among Bronze Age Minoans and Mycenaeans and served as insignia of rank and social status. They were influenced by the elaborate traditions of stamp and cylinder seals developed in the Near East and Egypt. The frequent appearance of bulls on seals may be inspired by the many Minoan palace wall-paintings and reliefs featuring the animal. In this sealstone the head and neck of the bull in the background are seen from behind.
  • statues

     (1600 BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    MinoanH of upper part: 5 11/16 in. (14.5 cm); H of lower part: 5 7/8 in. (14.9 cm)Acquired by Henry Walters, 1929
    This statue of a snake goddess has been carved with a drill and flat chisel. The upper part is dowelled into the lower. The goddess wears a tall headdress with a snake wound around it. Her hands are pierced to hold snakes. The headdress is broken off and the upper part has been repaired. The lower part has been restored with plaster.
  • jugs

     (8th century BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Cypriote12 7/8 x 12 1/8 in. (32.7 x 30.8 cm)Gift of the estate of Mrs. Samuel C. Lamport, 1952
    The playful inventiveness of the Cypriot potters is seen in this distinctive water jug. It is both functional and beautiful. The body of the jug looks like a barrel lying on its side. The style appears only during the Iron Age.
  • jugs

     (7th century BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Cypriote7 5/8 in. (19.3 cm)Museum purchase with funds provided by the S. & A. P. Fund, 1973
    This example of the popular pinched-spout jug is decorated with red paint on a pale background and is called Bichrome Ware. There were two distinct styles of this ceramic ware in Cyprus at this time: the "rectilinear," which features triangles, diamonds, and rectangles, was common in the eastern and southern regions of the island; the "circle" style, shown here, with groups of concentric circles, was found mostly in the western and northern areas.
  • figurines

     (ca. 2500-2400 BC)
    Title unavailable: The object name was used instead.
    Goulandris MasterH: 16 5/16 x W: 4 3/16 x D: 1 1/2 in. (41.5 x 10.7 x 3.75 cm)Museum purchase, 1993
    Figurines of this type, from the Cyclades islands in the Aegean Sea, have been found almost exclusively in tombs. Although it was first believed that these so-called "idols" represent deities, they probably should be interpreted more broadly as representations of "femaleness." The geometric shapes, the position of the arms across the abdomen, and the close-set legs with dangling feet are distinctive and may appear strikingly modern to the viewer today. This example represents the high point of Cycladic figurine carving, when the form had become extremely elegant.